Canada vows to follow Australia in making Facebook pay for news content

  • Canada vows to follow Australia in making Facebook pay for news content

Canada vows to follow Australia in making Facebook pay for news content

"What I'm pleased about is that Facebook's back at the table".

According to the news outlet, the law's implications on Australia's relations with major tech platforms are drawing attention from lawmakers in other countries who are mulling their own regulation measures.

We're happy to listen to them on on the technical issues of this, just like we listened to Google and came to a sensible arrangement.

Mr Morrison said he was continuing to mobilise worldwide support in the Federal Government's stoush with Facebook.

We spoke to Matt Perault, a former director of public policy at Facebook, and began by asking him what he made of facebook's move in Australia.

Morrison said the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and France's Emmanuel Macron were also monitoring the issue closely.

"I said to them on you can get an ad to me on your platforms in about two seconds but you're telling me you can't identify violent and extremist material and you can't get rid of it? And we discuss that a lot".

Facebook has returned to negotiations with the Australian government over a controversial media law, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Saturday.

Gallery: Facebook took the nuclear option in Australia.

A few days back, in a massive escalation of the brewing tensions between Facebook and the Australian government, the social networking company effectively banned all news content that originated from Australia from being seen by Aussies. "We called them out", Mr Morrison said.

The company has "tentatively friended us again", he quipped.

Last year, Facebook announced it would pay US news organizations including the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post and USA Today for headlines.

Here's the argument, from the perspective of the news publishers.