COVID-19 Fallout: US Faces ‘Dark Weeks Ahead’, Incoming CDC Head Warns

  • COVID-19 Fallout: US Faces ‘Dark Weeks Ahead’, Incoming CDC Head Warns

COVID-19 Fallout: US Faces ‘Dark Weeks Ahead’, Incoming CDC Head Warns

"By the middle of February, we expect half a million deaths in this country".

The airline industry will begin to feel the first major impact of a new rule by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with new testing requirements.

But Biden's incoming CDC director believes the number of deaths could get much worse. "And we still yet haven't seen the ramifications of what happened from the holiday travel, from holiday gathering in terms of high rates of hospitalisations and the deaths thereafter", she added.

Air passengers are required to get a viral test within the three days before their flight to the United States, and provide written documentation of their laboratory test result to the airline or provide documentation of having recovered from Covid-19.

Police at a temporary roadblock by the beach promenade in Tel Aviv during a nationwide
Police at a temporary roadblock by the beach promenade in Tel Aviv during a nationwide

According to the CDC, at least 122 cases of the more contagious strain of the virus were confirmed in 20 states, including in NY. However, the new strain has since been found in other countries such as Denmark, Netherlands, other European countries, and also South Africa. One of the main area of concerns, is the bottlenecks with the vaccine rollout.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), B.1.1.7, or otherwise known as VOC 202012/01, which was discovered in the United Kingdom back in December may lead to a large increase in the number of COVID-19 cases in the USA and may become the dominant strain of the virus in the coming months, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report released last week.

The report singled out approximately 76 cases of B.1.1.7, which have been documented in the USA since 13 January, stressing that "taking measures to reduce transmission now can lessen the potential impact of B.1.1.7 and allow critical time to increase vaccination coverage".

COVID-19 has sickened more than 23.5 million people and claimed the lives of more than 393,000 in the U.S.as of Saturday, according to a Johns Hopkins University coronavirus tracker.