CDC redefines 'close contact' to include multiple brief encounters

  • CDC redefines 'close contact' to include multiple brief encounters

CDC redefines 'close contact' to include multiple brief encounters

Jay Butler, the CDC's deputy director for infectious diseases, said that people might be exhausted of the advice but mask-wearing is more important than ever this fall and winter. "Smaller, more intimate gatherings of family, friends and neighbors may be driving transmission as well, especially as they move indoors".

In a press conference Wednesday, Jay Butler, the CDC's deputy director for infectious diseases, said the United States is "unfortunately seeing a distressing trend, with cases increasing in almost 75% of the country".

The CDC made the change after an investigation into a COVID-19 outbreak over the summer in a Vermont correctional facility.

The employee interacted with infected prisoners 22 times over the course of his 8-hour shift, with only short windows of exposure. Days later, the officer tested positive.

"This article adds to the scientific knowledge of the risk to contacts of those with covid-19 and highlights again the importance of wearing face masks to prevent transmission", the CDC was quoted in a report.

People who have come into close contact with a coronavirus-infected person are supposed to quarantine and be tested.

Although the correctional officer never spent 15 consecutive minutes within 6 feet of an IDP [incarcerated or detained persons] with COVID-19, numerous brief (approximately 1-minute) encounters that cumulatively exceeded 15 minutes did occur. "The official number is bad enough, but this suggests that there were many more people who were infected and died of this disease, but we didn't have good testing, and so we couldn't really identify them as coronavirus patients".

However, he added that close contact depends on exposure, environment, and infectivity of the carrier.

Former CDC director during the Obama administration, Tom Frieden, said that the updated guidance is a "sensible change".

The report found that two-thirds of excess deaths were directly caused by COVID-19.

The report noted that measures of excess deaths have been used to estimate the impact of past pandemics, as well as natural disasters, particularly when there are questions about potential undercount. And yes, the US still leads the world in not only the number of cases but the number of deaths from the virus. The U.S.is reporting close to 60,000 new coronavirus infections daily, a disturbing number that has grown 17 percent since last week. according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.