Antarctica CRISIS: South Pole is warming THREE times faster than the rest of Earth

  • Antarctica CRISIS: South Pole is warming THREE times faster than the rest of Earth

Antarctica CRISIS: South Pole is warming THREE times faster than the rest of Earth

While scientists have known for years that the outer regions of Antarctica is warming, they previously thought the South Pole, being located deep in its interior, was isolated from rising global temperatures. During the same period, on the other hand, the warming in West Antarctica had suddenly stopped and the Antarctic Peninsula had even begun cooling.

The research was carried out by an worldwide team of scientists who examined weather station data, gridded observations and climate models to assess the impact of global warming at the South Pole.

A new study has found that the South Pole has been warming up almost three times more than the rest of the earth.

The warm ocean temperatures in the western tropical Pacific Ocean lowers atmospheric over the Weddell Sea, which drives warm air towards the South Pole.

And this could be masking the heating effect of carbon pollution over the South Pole. "We found this is not the case any more", he told AFP. The two factors "have worked in tandem to make this one of the strongest warming trends on Earth", the study warns.

This is compared with approximately 0.2C (1.4F) rise for the rest of the planet.

"This study clearly demonstrates that the remoteness of a region is no barrier to it being susceptible to rapid climate change", said study co-author Gareth Marshall of the British Antarctic Survey in a statement.

The IPO cycle lasts roughly 15-30 years, and alternates between a "positive" state - in which the tropical Pacific is hotter and the northern Pacific is colder than average - and a "negative" state where the temperature anomaly is reversed.

This in turn had increased the flow of warm air directly over the South Pole - warming it by more than 1.83C (about 3.3F) since 1989.

The researchers say the actual observed warming exceeds 99.9 percent of all possible scenarios free of human influence, so while it is possible it could have occurred naturally, it is "extremely unlikely".

"The findings in this study primarily suggest that climate variability in the interior Antarctic is extreme and it undergoes extreme and abrupt flips", he says.