Facial Recognition Company Clearview AI Got Its Entire Client List Stolen

  • Facial Recognition Company Clearview AI Got Its Entire Client List Stolen

Facial Recognition Company Clearview AI Got Its Entire Client List Stolen

Thankfully, it doesn't appear the intruder was able to access Clearview's database of three billion images.

While several law enforcement agencies are known to use Clearview AI's services, the breach of its entire client list may cause some embarrassment for organizations using its services who wish to remain unknown. So, you would assume that Clearview has robust security.

The notification sent by Clearview AI to its customers said that the intruder knows precisely how many accounts are set up by each customer, and the number of searches conducted by them.

Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and other companies have threatened legal action against Clearview AI, instructing the company to stop scraping public images from their platforms to build its faces database.

Clearview told The Daily Beast the vulnerability has been fixed, and that law enforcement search histories were not revealed, nor were the company's servers compromised.

Clearview AI made the disclosure of the breach in an email to clients, saying an intruder "gained unauthorized access" to the client list. "Unfortunately, data breaches are part of life in the 21st century", Ekeland said, adding that the company will "continue to work to strengthen our security". The company assured The Daily Beast that security is its "top priority", but it's kind of a big deal that law enforcement agencies now employ a firm with a privacy rap sheet. "Our servers were never accessed".

"This is a company whose entire business model relies on collecting incredibly sensitive and personal information, and this breach is yet another sign that the potential benefits of Clearview's technology do not outweigh the grave privacy risks it poses", Sen.

The full client list of Clearview AI, the embattled facial recognition company, was stolen by someone with "unauthorized access", The Daily Beast first reported.