Greece: Storm kills six tourists in northern region

  • Greece: Storm kills six tourists in northern region

Greece: Storm kills six tourists in northern region

Authorities said around 100 people, mostly tourists, had been injured, and 23 of those had been admitted to hospital.

A Czech couple died when strong winds blew their caravan away while a Russian man and his son were killed by a falling tree, police said.

Powerful storms raged over Greece's northern Halkidiki region Wednesday, leaving at least six people dead and 20 injured as trees and electricity pylons toppled over, power was knocked out, and roads were blocked.

A Romanian woman and her child were killed when the roof of a restaurant collapsed at Nea Plagia, officials say, while a Russian man and his son were killed by a falling tree near their hotel in the seaside resort of Potidea.

Two Russian nationals, a man and young boy, were also killed after they were caught under a collapsed tree.

According to port police, a fisherman in his sixties was also missing.

Greece's newly-appointed citizens' protection minister is due to visit the region on Thursday.

Civil Protection Minister Mihalis Chrisochoidis, at the scene, said Greece was mourning the loss of life, adding: "In coming days all damage will be repaired".

"It is the first time in my 25-year career that I have lived through something like this", Athansios Kaltsas, director of the Nea Moudania Medical Center, where numerous injured were treated for fractures, told Greek television.

"It was so abrupt, and so sudden".

Kaltsas said patients taken to the clinic ranged in age from eight months to over 70. Meteorologist Klearxos Marousakis described conditions as "extremely unusual" for this time of year.

Adamidis said he expected power to return in most areas by Thursday night.

At least 140 rescue workers were involved in the operation, the emergency chief, Vassilis Varthakoyannis, said.

Indeed, the tornadoes and hailstorms that caused the destruction came after a period of hot weather, with temperatures as high as 40 degrees Celsius (104 Fahrenheit).