Nasa confirms water on the moon that may enable human exploration

  • Nasa confirms water on the moon that may enable human exploration

Nasa confirms water on the moon that may enable human exploration

It's located at the darkest and coldest parts of the moon's polar regions. "A future Moon mission is needed to examine the whole lunar PSRs to map out all water ices and understand the processes which led to water on the Moon".

Scientists have found the first glaciers on the surface of the moon.

The instrument was created to search for distinct signatures that prove the presence of water ice on the surface of the moon.

The discovery was confirmed thanks to data from NASA's Moon Mineralogy Mapper.

"We know that there's hundreds of billions of tons of water ice on the surface of the moon", Bridenstine said in a Reuters TV interview in Washington on Tuesday, a day after NASA unveiled its analysis of data collected from lunar orbit by a spacecraft from India.

Scientists say they have "directly observed definitive evidence" of water ice on the Moon's surface for the first time. The ice locations are seen in blue. M3 has already had a big lunar win - it helped discover water on the moon in 2009. The warmest temperatures in these areas don't go above negative-250 degrees Fahrenheit. As the Moon is tilted on its axis by about 1.54 degrees, sunlight never reaches these regions.

How the ice appeared on the moon is still a mystery.

The detection is important for future lunar missions, with the ice sitting close enough to the surface that it may even be possible that future expeditions use it as a resource. However, Fairweather said this definitely does not indicate the presence of life on the moon. Additionally, the European Space Agency (ESA) and China's space exploration arm of the China National Space Administration have already been in talks moving toward building a Moon-base, a spokesperson for the ESA confirmed past year.

Now, scientists can be more confident in saying water exists on the moon with the new findings published on in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.