Fears over Ebola resurgence after responders killed in targeted attack

  • Fears over Ebola resurgence after responders killed in targeted attack

Fears over Ebola resurgence after responders killed in targeted attack

"These constant attacks must stop".

"Ebola was retreating. These attacks will give it force again, and more people will die as a effect", said Tedros. "We are heartbroken that our worst fears have been realized".

"Our focus is caring for the wounded and ensuring staff at other locations are safe", he added.

'Ebola was retreating. These attacks will give it force again, and more people will die as a outcome, ' WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said. "These attacks challenge efforts to date", Muyembe said.

Police said the three dead were World Health Organization (WHO) workers.

In addition, many local health workers have been recruited by the "well-paying" Ebola response, leading to shortages of trained people to deal with other serious health issues such as an even deadlier measles outbreak and malaria, the medical charity Doctors Without Borders said in a statement.

Vast tracts of eastern DRC are in the grip of armed groups, especially a shadowy militia called the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF). Numerous six others wounded were with Congo's Health Ministry.

The WHO said 49 of its nonessential staff were flown to the eastern city of Goma, leaving 71, while UNICEF temporarily relocated 27 staff, leaving 12 in Beni.

Ebola transmission in the provinces of North Kivu and Ituri was paying off after several months of hard work by the workers, and the responders also found the root cause for the breakout, says Ryan.

The latest rebel attack outside Beni killed 19 people, the United Kingdom said on Wednesday.

The protests also prompted WHO to put a hold on Ebola response work in the city, sparking concern from health experts.

More than 2000 people have died from the disease since the outbreak was declared in August 2018. In the past 21 days, there have been 23 recorded cases of the disease, seven of which occurred in the past week, which is down from its peak of 120 cases a week in April, WHO said.

Ian Norton, at WHO's Emergency Medical Team Unit, said the United Nations agency had begun training some of the Ebola teams in DRC to also manage measles cases, "because there is such a large burden". Most of the recent new cases have been reported in the newly targeted communities of Biakato, Mangina and Beni. "We call on everyone who has a role to play to end this cycle of violence".