J.D. Salinger's books are finally going digital format

  • J.D. Salinger's books are finally going digital format

J.D. Salinger's books are finally going digital format

J.D. Salinger's estate plans to publish some of the reclusive author's classic stories in e-book form this week.

NEW YORK (AP) - You'll finally be able to catch the late J.D. Salinger's books in digital format. He not only stopped releasing new work, but rejected any reissues or e-book editions.

Longtime Salinger publisher Little, Brown and Company said all four of his works, including "The Catcher and the Rye", will be made available as e-books Tuesday, marking the first time that the entirety of his published work will be available in digital format.

It wasn't until recent years that Matt Salinger considered digitizing his reclusive father's legendary work: First, he received a letter from a woman who said she had a disability that made reading printed books hard. But now, in an effort to keep his father's books in front of a new generation of readers, the younger Salinger is beginning to ease up, gradually lifting a cloud of secrecy that has obscured the life and work of one of America's most influential and enigmatic writers. Things began to change around 2014, when he received a letter from a woman who explained she had a disability that made reading printed books hard. Even as publishers and consumers adopted e-books and digital audio, Salinger's books remained defiantly offline, a effect of the writer's distaste for computers and technology. But he said any publication of new works may be years away.

"I hear his voice really clearly in my head, and there's no doubt in my mind about 96 percent of the decisions I have to make, because I know what he would have wanted", Mr. Salinger said.

"Things like e-books and audiobooks are tough, because he clearly didn't want them", Matt added.

The release is part of a centennial celebration of the author's birth.

Matt, only five when Salinger published his final story, "Hapworth 16, 1924", is also working to release his father's unprinted writing-a project estimated to take another five to seven years.