United Kingdom government still preparing for 'no deal' Brexit - May's spokesman

  • United Kingdom government still preparing for 'no deal' Brexit - May's spokesman

United Kingdom government still preparing for 'no deal' Brexit - May's spokesman

The Government will bring forward the Withdrawal Agreement Bill in the week beginning June 3, a spokesman said, after Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn held fresh talks on Tuesday evening.

It will be the fourth time that the House of Commons votes on May's Brexit deal, after rejecting it in each prior vote.

"We are approaching the moment of truth", a cabinet minister said of the prime minister's decision, which effectively puts her premiership on the line.

But Corbyn, whose negotiating team has been holding talks with government ministers for more than four weeks to find a way to break the deadlock in parliament, raised doubts over whether Labour could back the Withdrawal Bill. Vara, who voted for remain in the 2016 referendum, said May's deal "leaves the United Kingdom in a half-way house with no time limit on when we will finally be a sovereign nation".

Ranil Jayawardena, parliamentary private secretary at the Department for Work and Pensions, wrote in his resignation letter that the draft deal is not fair to those who voted to leave the European Union "taking back control of our laws, our borders and our money".

US investment bank JP Morgan said on Tuesday it was hard to see May surviving beyond the end of June.

Ministers are split on whether asking parliament to choose its preferred Brexit, probably based on ranking different options, is a Trojan Horse to deliver what some see as an appalling Brexit in Name Only, a disgraceful abdication of responsibility by government, an impractical and total waste of time or a longshot that is worth exploring given that all other initiatives to secure a departure from the European Union have failed.

Both May and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn are under strong pressure from their party members not to make concessions to their rivals.

May was seeking a "stable majority in Parliament that will ensure the safe passage of the Withdrawal Agreement Bill and the UK's swift exit from the EU", the spokesman said.

Parliament usually breaks for the summer in the second half of July although the exact date has not yet been set. "We urge you to think again".

"No leader can bind his or her successor so the deal would likely be at best temporary, at worst illusory", said the letter, whose signatories included Gavin Williamson, who was sacked as defence minister this month, and former foreign minister Boris Johnson.