Deepest ever dive finds plastic bag at bottom of Mariana Trench

  • Deepest ever dive finds plastic bag at bottom of Mariana Trench

Deepest ever dive finds plastic bag at bottom of Mariana Trench

A Texas businessman and deep-sea explorer descended 35,853 feet into the depths of the Pacific Ocean to shatter the record for the world's deepest dive-and he found plastic trash.

The expedition reached a maximum depth of 10,928 meters into the Trench.

A key mission objective was to capture video evidence of what was at the bottom of the Challenger Deep, which was first explored in 1960 by oceanographers Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard in submersible called Bathyscaphe Trieste.

In an interview with CNN, the American diver said his team were going to perform tests on the creatures to determine the percentage of plastics found in them.

The United Nations estimates 100 million tons of plastic waste already occupies the world's oceans and large volumes of microplastic have been discovered in the intestinal tracts of deep-dwelling ocean mammals, UK's Telegraph newspaper reported.

Regarding the new species, "Expedition, scientists are still analyzing and confirming the species details so it's too early to say", a spokesperson for The Five Deeps Expedition told IFLScience.

He's also been to the highest peak of every continent and to the bottom of four of the world's oceans.

Thus far, in addition to the Mariana Trench feat, Vescovo has become the first human to dive the deepest points in the Puerto Rico Trench of the Atlantic Ocean (27,480 feet in December 2018), the South Sandwich Trench of the Southern Ocean (24,388 feet in January 2019) and the Java Trench in the Indian Ocean (23,596 feet in April 2019). They found one 8,530 feet (2,600 m) below the surface, one 14,600 feet (4,450 m) and two at the deepest point they reached.

On one occasion, he spent four hours on the trench floor, viewing sea life ranging from shrimp-like anthropods with long legs and antennae, to translucent sea pigs, which are similar to sea cucumbers.

It can withstand the crushing pressure found at the bottom of the ocean: 1,000 bars, which is the equivalent of 50 jumbo jets piled on top of a person.

As well as working under pressure, the sub has to operate in the pitch black and near freezing temperatures.

The expedition is being filmed for Discovery Channel.

Diving isn't Vescovo's only passion- he's also a climber.

Anthony Geffen, creative director of Atlantic Productions, said it was the most complicated filming he'd ever been involved with.

"It feels like a great privilege that I was able to do this as a human being", he said. On May 3, the Limiting Factor submersible freed and recovered a Five Deeps Expedition scientific lander that had got stuck at the bottom of Challenger Deep in a previous dive.