No confirmed measles in MidCentral, but it could spread

  • No confirmed measles in MidCentral, but it could spread

No confirmed measles in MidCentral, but it could spread

Canterbury Medical Officer of Health Dr Ramon Pink says it is pleasing measles numbers haven't increased over the past 24 hours.

In the U.S., 228 individual cases of measles have been confirmed in 12 states, by the CDC, between January 1 to March 7, 2019. There is a risk of developing measles for up to 21 days after contact with a case of measles.

The CDC says the majority of cases involve people who were not vaccinated against measles.

MMR vaccine being drawn into a syringe - the combined vaccine which protects infants from three viral diseases: measles, mumps and rubella. We are not now offering early use of the vaccine or early administration of the second dose of the vaccine.

The measles immunisation is free for those who need it.

MidCentral District Health Board Medical officer of health Dr Rob Weir
SUPPLIEDMidCentral District Health Board Medical officer of health Dr Rob Weir

Weir said general practices throughout the MidCentral district were holding normal supplies of the vaccine despite the extra demand coming from Canterbury.

In response to the ongoing, worldwide measles epidemic, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated 17 country Travel Alerts, on March 11, 2019. If unimmunised people are exposed to measles, they also risk spreading the virus to vulnerable people, including babies, pregnant women, cancer patients and others who are unable to be immunised.

Symptoms of measles included fever, a runny nose, and sore watery red eyes for several days before a red blotchy rash appeared. People are infectious from five days before the rash appears to five days after.

"If you think you may have measles, stay at home and phone your GP for advice".

It was very important people said they might have measles before turning up at a health centre.