Russian Federation successfully launches manned spacecraft for space station

  • Russian Federation successfully launches manned spacecraft for space station

Russian Federation successfully launches manned spacecraft for space station

Two astronauts and a cosmonaut launched aboard a Soyuz MS-12 spacecraft to the International Space Station at 3:14 p.m. ET Thursday from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

An investigation showed then that the abortive launch was caused by a sensor damaged during the rocket's assembly at the cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Space expert Vadim Lukashevich said last-minute replacements were nothing out of the ordinary.

"I'm 100 percent confident in the rocket and the spaceship", said the 43-year-old Hague.

The failed launch was "a little disappointing" after preparations for the flight that lasted a year-and-a-half but also "an interesting and needed experience" that tested the depth of the space programme's preparedness, the 47-year-old said. They were originally scheduled to launch in October, but had to abort their mission after their Soyuz rocket had a booster separation malfunction.

Koch, a 40-year-old rookie, said the SpaceX success was a "great example of what we've been doing for a very long time".

NASA head Jim Bridenstine congratulated the Soyuz crew on a successful launch in a brief statement. "And that is cooperating among partners and making things that are very hard look easy", she said.

The trio's arrival will return the orbiting laboratory's crew to six in all.

The trio consists of NASA astronauts Nick Hague and Christina Koch as well as Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin. Three spacewalks are planned, one of which will mark the first all-female spacewalk with Anne McClain and Christina Koch. "Ad Astra!" he wrote on his Twitter page. Delayed Entrance This launch will bring the space station back to full capacity, at six team members, and NASA has expressed excitement about the work that can be done with a full crew.