Eating eggs can lead to higher risk of cardiovascular disease

  • Eating eggs can lead to higher risk of cardiovascular disease

Eating eggs can lead to higher risk of cardiovascular disease

It's been debated for years: Are eggs good or bad for you?

Still, since higher consumption than average of either cholesterol or eggs is related to an increase in cardiovascular disease incidents like stroke and early death, the new finding is significant when considering the population at large, he said.

"The take-home message is really about cholesterol, which happens to be high in eggs and specifically yolks", Norrina Allen, associate professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and one of the authors of the study, said in a statement.

Zhong told Newsweek that the team was surprised to find the risks associated with eating eggs and other cholesterol-rich foods were apparent even in those who ate relatively healthy diets.

Why? "The association of egg consumption and dietary cholesterol with [cardiovascular disease], although debated for decades, has more recently been thought to be less important", wrote Eckel, who was not involved in the research.

The 10 top local news stories from metro Boston and around New England delivered daily. In a study published Friday in the medical journal JAMA, he and his colleagues noted that a single large egg contains about 186 mg of cholesterol.

Whether eating eggs or cholesterol, which is also found in products such as red meat, processed meat and high-fat dairy products, is linked to cardiovascular disease and death has always been a subject of debate, the researchers said.

The new findings contradict the latest dietary guidelines for Americans, released in 2015; in them, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) said that Americans no longer had to worry about keeping their cholesterol intake within a certain limit. However, the guidelines omit a daily limit for the substance.

The change in the dietary guidelines came as critics questioned whether the government has issued advice in the past that had proven unnecessary or exaggerated, The Washington Post reported. It's a toss-up. Eggs are a good source of nutrients, such as protein and vitamin D, the AHA says.

The researchers based their conclusions on what participants said they ate at the start of each study. That's because the average United States adult now gets 300 milligrams of cholesterol a day and eats three or four eggs a week - and their data indicates it's bad for them.

Researchers at Northwestern University analyzed 30,000 USA adults over three decades and found that eating just three to four eggs per week was tied to increased cholesterol and a 6 percent higher risk of heart disease.

Researchers at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine and elsewhere pooled results from six previous studies, analyzing data on nearly 30,000 US adults who self-reported daily food intake.

The researchers controlled the data to account for other foods in the diet, so while that pile of bacon on your breakfast plate may be a problem, it doesn't exonerate the eggs. Just cut back is their suggestion.

"There's always been a [suggestion in the data] that eggs can raise cholesterol and create cardiovascular harm", said Dr. Andrew Freeman, director of the Cardiovascular Prevention and Wellness program at National Jewish Health hospital in Denver.

"A more appropriate recommendation would be eating egg whites instead of whole eggs or eating whole eggs in moderation, for the goal of reducing risk of cardiovascular disease and death", he said.

The new data suggest that eating eggs increases the risk of heart attack or stroke, although the study does not establish a causal link.