Google employee breaks Guinness World Record calculating 31.4 trillion digits of Pi

  • Google employee breaks Guinness World Record calculating 31.4 trillion digits of Pi

Google employee breaks Guinness World Record calculating 31.4 trillion digits of Pi

Google employee Emma Haruka Iwao has absolutely smashed the previous world record for calculating Pi by adding nearly nine trillion more digits. If you're Google, however, you celebrate March 14 by breaking a Guinness World Record with a pi calculation.

The contstant is used in engineering, physics, supercomputing and space exploration - because its value can be used in calculations for waves and circles.

Researchers have been competing to calculate the most digits of Pi for years - often with the help of supercomputers - but this announcement marks the first time the record has been broken using a commercial cloud service, exceeding the previous best by about nine trillion digits. The previous record, set by Peter Trueb in late 2016, was 22.4 trillion digits.

Emma further explains that this was possible using a Pi-benchmark, y-cruncher which was developed by Alexander J. Yee on Google Compute Engine virtual machine cluster. It required 1.4TB of memory and 240TB of SSD-based storage (it is the first Pi record to use SSDs).

From start to finish, the computation took 121 days. During the entire time it took for calculations, the Google Cloud server were kept switched on to avoid any interruptions.

When I think of pi, I think of three digits: 3.14.

Mathematician James Grime says that just 39 digits of pi is enough to calculate the circumference of the known universe, and NASA's Jet Propulsion lab only uses 15 digits to calculate interplanetary travel.

A member of Google's staff has broken the world record for calculating Pi to the highest number of digits - at 31 trillion. The interesting thing about Pi is that it's value is infinite in length.

'When I was a kid, I didn't have access to supercomputers But even if you don't work for Google, you can apply for various scholarships and programs to access computing resources.