Russian Federation planning test to disconnect its internet from world wide web

  • Russian Federation planning test to disconnect its internet from world wide web

Russian Federation planning test to disconnect its internet from world wide web

The Russian government, however, has promised to foot the bill to help concerned ISPs pay the costs related to new infrastructure and servers that will be required under the new law.

Average Russians would not lose internet access; the plan would instead change how internet traffic is handled on the back-end.

Roskomnazor will inspect the traffic to block prohibited content and make sure traffic between Russian users stays inside the country, and is not re-routed uselessly through servers overseas, where it could be intercepted.

There's no official date for when this move might take place, but the BBC reports that it would likely occur before April 1. It's not clear if this test will disrupt Internet connectivity inside Russian Federation or not but all Internet providers have agreed to participate.

The disconnect experiment is being overseen by Russia's Information Security Working Group; its members include Natalya Kaspersky, the co-founder of Kaspersky Lab, which has faced backlash overseas over allegations that the Russian government used Kaspersky Lab products to spy on computers.

RBK reported that all internet providers agreed with the law's goals, but disagreed with its technical implementation, which they believe will cause major disruptions to Russian internet traffic. The Russian state is said to have been behind several large scale attacks on Western governments in recent years, using anonymous hacker groups such as APT 28, which is also known as Fancy Bear, as cover.

The move comes after a law was passed in the Kremlin past year that ordered changes to be made so that Russian Federation could operate independently on the net, should the need arise. Ongoing discussions are in regards to finding the proper technical methods to disconnect Russian Federation from the internet with minimal downtime to consumers and government agencies. This is similar to the Great Firewall of China, but with the ability to maintain independence with an isolated intranet if needed.