Medical marijuana patients are driving high

  • Medical marijuana patients are driving high

Medical marijuana patients are driving high

Of the almost 800 of MI medical cannabis users surveyed, 51 percent admitted to driving while "a little high" and 21 percent said they had driven while "very high".

A new study of patients who use medical cannabis to treat chronic pain finds more than half say they've driven under the influence in the past six months.

Driving under the influence of marijuana in MI is against the law - even for medical marijuana patients.

The researchers surveyed adults in MI who were seeking medical cannabis recertification or a new certification for chronic pain in 2014 and 2015.

790 adults seeking medical cannabis certification or recertification for moderate/severe pain were recruited from February 2014 through June 2015 at MI medical cannabis clinics.

Fifty-six percent of those who take medical marijuana for chronic pain admit that in the last six months they've driven under the influence of marijuana within two hours of using it.

"In light of cannabis policies expanding legal access to cannabis and given the risks of impaired driving, these findings underscore the needs for interventions to prevent impaired driving among individuals using cannabis for medical reasons", the authors wrote. Researchers surveyed nearly 800 people from MI and asked about their history of driving within two hours of using cannabis in the past six months. He said we need more specific guidance on how to use it in as safe a way as possible. "Or at least avoid driving for several hours after using marijuana".

That law, which allows any MI resident over the age of 21 to use marijuana inside a private residence, became legal in December.

Neurologist Dr. Orrin Devinsky of NYU Langone Health conducted the trials that led to the first FDA approved cannabis medication, a drug for epilepsy.