New Technology Could Potentially Shut Down Netflix Account Sharing

  • New Technology Could Potentially Shut Down Netflix Account Sharing

New Technology Could Potentially Shut Down Netflix Account Sharing

A British software company Synamedia has developed a programme created to stop users of media streaming services, such as HBO and Netflix, from illegally sharing passwords to their accounts with others.

British firm Synamedia uses machine learning to spot shared passwords on streaming services like Netflix and HBO and rat out the offending users.

Synamedia presented the technology at the CES 2019 conference in Las Vegas.

Once data has been analysed, the streaming service can then decide the course of action for users believed to be sharing their passwords.

Synamedia's AI software analyzes which users are logged in at any current moment and then flag those accounts that are being shared, the Daily Mail reports.

Media research firm Magid found that 26 per cent of millennials share passwords for video streaming services.

'Casual credentials sharing is becoming too expensive to ignore, ' said Jean Marc Racine, the CPO of Synamedia.

Meanwhile Parks Associates predicts that by 2021, $9.9billion of pay-tv revenues and $1.2billion of streaming revenues will be lost to password sharing. It's more heavily aimed at larger credentials-sharing operations across all streaming service. Our new solution gives operators the ability to take action.

The system could let the company operating it specify how many users should be able to use a single account, which comes in handy for various family plans.

Synamedia says that until now, content providers have turned a blind eye to casual password sharing as it helps market their service to new audiences.

The system can work out if the service is being used in a "wrong" location - and knows when people are using it in their homes or holiday homes, for example. Many casual users will be happy to pay an additional fee for a premium, shared service with a greater number of concurrent users.

This story originally appeared in The Sun.