Theresa May loses second Brexit vote in two days

  • Theresa May loses second Brexit vote in two days

Theresa May loses second Brexit vote in two days

Theresa May has been forced to present MPs with a new Brexit plan within three days if her current one is voted down next week, in a move meant to lessen the chance of Britain exiting the European Union without a deal.

Losing the vote would deepen uncertainty over the future of Brexit, Britain's biggest shift in foreign and trade policy for more than 40 years.

May called off the December vote at the last minute when it became clear that a majority of lawmakers - from the governing Conservatives as well as opposition parties - opposed the deal, a compromise that has left both pro-European and pro-Brexit politicians unhappy.

Several Conservative MPs accused Bercow of being biased, and there was speculation of an attempt to remove him from his post.

The government downplayed the significance of its defeat.

But her spokesman added: "If that were not to take place. we would respond quickly and provide certainty on the way forward".

Wednesday's decision came as MPs began five days of debate on May's deal and is the latest example of legislators seeking to tie the government's hands over Brexit, with less than three months to go before the United Kingdom leaves the European Union on March 29.

Effectively this constrains the government's ability to act to keep its taxation system working smoothly if it pursues a no-deal Brexit against the wishes of a majority in parliament.

Rather than warming to Mrs May's deal since then, MPs have tried to wrest control of Brexit from the Government and put it in the hands of Parliament.

He said: "That sticker on the subject of Brexit happens to be affixed to or in the windscreen of my wife's auto, and I'm sure he wouldn't suggest for one moment that a wife is somehow the property or chattel of her husband".

May insisted Wednesday that "further clarification" from the European Union was possible, "and those talks will continue over the next few days".

The government also offered a concession to Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party, saying the British province would have "a strong role" in any decision between triggering the backstop or extending a transition period if a future relationship with the European Union is not in place by December 2020.

Her deal, he said, was "ruinous".

Britain's de-facto deputy prime minister, David Lidington, said politicians must abandon "fantasies about magical alternative deals that are somehow going to sort of spring out of a cupboard in Brussels". Robert Jenrick, a Conservative MP and the exchequer secretary to the Treasury said the Finance Bill amendment would only allow MPs power to make "minor technical changes".

Nevertheless the vote will be seen as another blow to the Prime Minister's authority as she struggles to win support for her Withdrawal Agreement.

The prime minister has already pulled the vote once with defeat looming, and a loss for the government would plunge Britain into "uncharted territory", according to May, putting the whole process up for grabs.

"We're all focused in the government on winning parliamentary support in the vote that's coming up next week", he told reporters as he arrived at the meeting in Brussels. But there is little indication that many MPs have been swayed and the deal is nearly certain to be defeated on Tuesday. Ms.