Chocolates, caramels sold nationwide may be contaminated with Hepatitis A

The sweets are individually wrapped marshmallows dipped in chocolate or caramel, according to the FDA website.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently issued a warning to consumers about certain sweets made in Kentucky that could be contaminated with hepatitis A, a highly contagious liver disease, the New York Post reported.

Bauer's sweets released a statement on their website regarding the FDA alert, explaining that a worker in their facility tested positive for hepatitis A. The company has since closed the facility and discarded all of the candy inside. The sweets were sold exclusively online and through QVC. This posting will be updated with recall and retail information as it becomes available.

There have been no reports of hepatitis A related cases.

Officials recommend those who ate the sweets purchased after November 14 consult with their healthcare provider to determine whether post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is indicated, even though the risk of hepatitis A transmission from the candy is low. Consumers and retailers have been advised to throw away and not to eat the affected sweets purchased after November 14.

The disease targets the liver and the effects can range from mild to severe.

Symptoms - which include fever, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and dark urine - can take anywhere from two to seven weeks after exposure to appear. Young children may not show symptoms of HAV infection. Consumers and retailers should throw away and not consume any chocolate or caramel Modjeskas purchased after November 14, 2018.