World's First Baby Born Via Womb Transplant From Dead Donor

  • World's First Baby Born Via Womb Transplant From Dead Donor

World's First Baby Born Via Womb Transplant From Dead Donor

TThe first successful birth of a child from a womb transplanted from a dead donor in Brazil should give hope to thousands of British women that they can have children, doctors said.

The baby girl was born almost a year ago to a 32-year-old woman who wasn't born with a uterus, according to the report detailed in the medical journal Lancet on Tuesday.

The donor was a 45-year-old woman who died of subarachnoid haemorrhage - a type of stroke involving bleeding on the surface of the brain.

A baby girl weighing 2.55kg (6.6lbs) was born by caesarean section after a pregnancy lasting 35 weeks and three days. A year later, doctors say the mother and child are healthy.

While babies born from live donor uterus transplants have been done almost a dozen times before, including once in 2017 at Baylor Scott & White Hospital in Dallas, this birth marks the first time doctors have been able to remove the uterus from a recently deceased donor and have it result in a live birth.

Researchers say the case study, published Tuesday in The Lancet, shows that such transplants from deceased donors are feasible and may increase options for women struggling with uterine infertility.

The whole field of uterus transplantation is in its early days. Shortly thereafter, surgeons performed a uterus transplant, connecting the donor organ to the recipient's veins, arteries, ligaments and vaginal canals during a surgery that lasted more than 10 hours.

The case was proof-of-concept that deceased donor uterine transplantation was "a new option for women with uterine infertility" lead researcher and gynaecologist Dr Dani Ejzenberg said. After the transplant, the woman began a regimen of immunosuppressant medication to ensure she would not reject the donor organ.

Five months after the surgery, the medical team observed no signs of rejection, noting that ultrasound scans were normal and the recipient experienced regular menstruation. Seven months after the transplant, doctors transferred an embryo made via in-vitro fertilization from the woman's egg and her husband's sperm into her womb.

"The numbers of people willing and committed to donate organs upon their own deaths are far larger than those of live donors, offering a much wider potential donor population", said Ejzenberg, according to Reuters. The woman had ovaries and a vagina, but no uterus.

The baby girl was born in December 2017, but had to be closely monitored to ensure she was meeting appropriate developmental milestones.

There have been a total of 39 live donor transplants, resulting in 11 live births in the past five years.

He said live uterus donors are rare and typically eligible family members or close friends of women seeking the transplant.

Dr Srdjan Saso, from Imperial College London, said the results were "extremely exciting".

Richard Kennedy, president of the International Federation of Fertility Societies (IFFS), said: "The IFFS welcomes this announcement which is an anticipated evolution from live donors with clear advantages and the prospect of increasing supply for women with hitherto untreatable infertility".

Although uterus transplants are a growing area of medicine, they remain highly experimental and are very hard surgeries to complete.