3-nation crew lands safely on ISS after Soyuz accident

  • 3-nation crew lands safely on ISS after Soyuz accident

3-nation crew lands safely on ISS after Soyuz accident

In addition to Kononenko, a veteran cosmonaut making his fourth trip to space, the Soyuz carried Anne McClain from the United States and David Saint-Jacques from Canada, both first-time space travelers.

The program of ISS Expedition 58 includes applied scientific research and experiments, implementation of scheduled tasks associated with the station's maintenance and outfitting the station with equipment delivered by the cargo transports, as well as the EVA performance. In addition, Kononenko and Prokopiev 11 December will be released into outer space to explore the ship "Soyuz MS-09" where you previously found the hole.

An worldwide crew aboard a Russian-made Soyuz rocket docked safely at the global Space Station (ISS) on Monday, the first manned voyage to the ISS since a mission in October was aborted midair because of a rocket malfunction.

They'll stay aboard the space station for about 6.5 months performing science and learning how to live in space.

The first failed mission raised concerns about Moscow's Soviet-designed spacecraft, however, Russia's Rocosmos space agency has confirmed that the previous aborted mission was caused by a faulty sensor.

The station's current crew of NASA's Serena Aunon-Chancellor, Russian Sergei Prokopyev and German Alexander Gerst were waiting to greet the newcomers.

The Soyuz is the only means of reaching the ISS since the U.S. retired the space shuttle in 2011. Auñón-Chancellor, Gerst, and Prokopyev will return to Earth on December 20 at 12:03 am ET (undocking is December 19 at 8:42 pm ET).

The launch was closely scrutinised because of the abortive mission to the ISS on October 11, which ended two minutes after take-off when a rocket failure forced its two-man crew to perform an emergency landing. They managed to emerge safely despite the harrowing ordeal.

Russian Federation said last month the launch failed because of a sensor that was damaged during assembly at the Baikonur cosmodrome but insisted the spacecraft remained reliable.

In March 2019, the station will again return to a full complement of six crew members when they are joined for Expedition 59 by NASA astronauts Nick Hague and Christina Koch and Alexey Ovchinin of Roscosmos.

Russian space officials took measures to prevent the repeat of such a rocket failure. Nasa administrator Jim Bridenstine meanwhile thanked the U.S. and Russian teams "for their dedication to making this launch a success".

"We have confirmation of the spacecraft separation; Soyuz capsule and crew are safely in orbit", NASA said.

The Soyuz spacecraft is now the only vehicle that can ferry crews to the space station, but Russian Federation stands to lose that monopoly in the coming years with the arrival of SpaceX's Dragon and Boeing's Starliner crew capsules.