Tricks And (Non-Allergenic) Treats: Project Aims For Halloween Inclusion

  • Tricks And (Non-Allergenic) Treats: Project Aims For Halloween Inclusion

Tricks And (Non-Allergenic) Treats: Project Aims For Halloween Inclusion

The bluish-green colored jack-o'-lanterns are there to let parents know which homes are offering allergy-friendly alternatives for children who suffer from food allergies. The initiative is called the "Teal Pumpkin Project" and its goal is to support trick or treaters with food allergies.The project was started by the food allergy research and education in 2014.

Affordable non-food items are available at dollar stores, party supply stores, or online shops, and low-priced items can be purchased and handed out to all trick-or-treaters, or made available in a separate bowl from candy if a resident chooses to hand out both options.

"Right now, in some of the stores, the Christmas lights are out and they have different teal versions of those lights and they can be strung across the porch, or on a pumpkin".

Thousands of people, including many in the Denver metro area, participate in the program.

"You don't have to have one of these for every trick-or-treater", said Watters.

According to Food Allergy Research and Education, one out of every thirteen children in the US has at least one food allergy.

Trick-or-treating is a fun activity for most children, but for kids with food allergies, it can be a challenge. "I saw that you have a teal pumpkin, I'm here for the non-food treats, 'you can pull that out that bowl for that child". "Just a small bowl with like five of your non-food items, and then a separate bowl for the candy".