Native Kansan okay after rocket malfunction during launch

  • Native Kansan okay after rocket malfunction during launch

Native Kansan okay after rocket malfunction during launch

NASA said that rescue teams have reached Hague and Ovchinin and they've been taken out of the capsule and were in good condition.

The rocket was carrying a Russian cosmonaut and an American astronaut who had set off for a six-month mission at the International Space Station, on a relatively rare two-man launch.

Search and rescue teams were scrambled to the touchdown location as NASA revealed the descent meant the Russian-built Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft had to take "a sharper angle of landing compared to normal". The last failure of a manned Soyuz launch was in 1983 when a booster exploded.

"The launch had a problem with the booster (rocket) a few seconds after the first stage separation and we can confirm now that the crew has started to go into ballistic descent mode", the voiceover on a NASA livestream from mission control in Houston said.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters that the most important thing was that the two men were alive.

It's exceptionally hard to believe Roscosmos could rush through an incident investigation before the scheduled December 20th launch of Soyuz MS-11, even if the fault is found to be operational and not with the rocket itself.

It was the latest in a recent series of failures for the troubled Russian space program, which is used by the U.S.to carry its astronauts to the station. The two crew members, astronaut Nick Hague and cosmonaut Aleksey Ovchinin, made it back to the surface safe and sound.

Russian investigators said they were launching a criminal probe into the accident, the first such incident on a manned flight in the country's post-Soviet history. Russian space agency Roscosmos has released photographs of both astronauts being checked over after their abrupt landing.

Even if the Soyuz spacecraft is cleared for launch before December, Hadfield said, it could end up carrying astronauts from Thursday's launch rather than the next scheduled crew.

Back in 2015 Progress spacecraft - unmanned transport spacecraft that sent supplies to the ISS - had problems on launchers similar to the Soyuz rocket that experienced problems on Thursday.

Neither the United States nor Russian Federation will be able to send astronauts to the ISS until investigators determine why a Soyuz rocket experienced an anomaly after blastoff Thursday, complicating an already tricky launch calendar for 2019.

The launch failure follows close on the heels of another Soyuz issue, in which a hole was discovered August 29 on the MS-09 spacecraft that delivered the most recent crew to the space station.

The Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft carrying astronaut Nick Hague of the USA and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of Russian Federation blasted off from the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, on Thursday. With Thursday's failed launch, just three people remain on the station, an American astronaut, Serena Auñón-Chancellor, the German Commander Alexander Gerst, and Russian Sergey Prokopyev.

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, who watched the launch at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome along with his Russian counterpart, tweeted that Hague and Ovchinin are in good condition. Then, a rocket malfunctioned shortly before launch, and the crew vehicle was ejected to safety.