Khashoggi case: A 'chilling message to dissidents worldwide'

  • Khashoggi case: A 'chilling message to dissidents worldwide'

Khashoggi case: A 'chilling message to dissidents worldwide'

Indication of those stakes came within four months of Trump taking office, when Saudi Arabia became his first destination on a presidential trip and he announced $110 billion in proposed arms sales.

"Would be nice to definitively rule out that the Saudis are paying the president massive bribes in exchange for tacit approval for murdering critics!"

Host Brian Kilmeade asked Trump about a Washington Post report that claimed Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman was behind the October 2 disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi, saying it appears to "go to the top".

The Washington Post quoted a Turkish official as saying authorities suspect a 15-member team killed the journalist at the consulate.

Members of Congress have grown increasingly insistent that the administration find out what happened to Khashoggi. This has led to "speculation by officials and analysts in multiple countries", according to the Post, that the original plan may have been to capture Khashoggi and take him back to Saudi Arabia, and that the journalist had been killed when that plan somehow went south. The Post's source added it was unclear how the Saudi's planned on handling Khashoggi after receiving him or if the U.S. warned him that he was targeted. After the consulate, we were going to buy appliances for our new home and set a date.

Earlier on Wednesday, Turkish media outlets published CCTV footage which they say shows evidence of a plot linked to Mr Khashoggi's disappearance.

Mr Erdogan has not accused Saudi Arabia of being responsible for Khashoggi's disappearance but has said that if the Saudis have footage of him leaving the consulate they should release it.

Turkish sources have said they believe Khashoggi was killed inside the building and his body was removed, allegations that Riyadh dismisses as baseless.

Republican Sen. Bob Corker, who as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee has reviewed the USA intelligence into what happened to Khashoggi, said "the likelihood is he was killed on the day he walked into the consulate".

Khashoggi is a prominent Saudi journalist who was living in a self-imposed exile.

Corker spoke with reporters after the letter was released, and he emphasized that senators "specifically said it included the highest members of the regime" and could "absolutely" lead to USA sanctions targeting the Saudi Crown Prince, Mohammad bin Salman Al Saud.

The Trump administration, from the president on down, is heavily invested in the Saudi relationship.

"Part of that is what we are doing with our defense systems and everybody is wanting them and frankly, I think that would be very, very tough pill to swallow for our country".

But Riyadh has insisted that Khashoggi left the consulate alive, and that they are unaware of his whereabouts.

The conflict in Yemen is another issue Khashoggi has disagreed with his government over, calling on Riyadh to end the "cruel war" and "to face the damage that resulted from more than three years of war".

President Donald Trump told reporters at the White House on October 10 that he has spoken with Saudi Arabia officials and said he was "concerned" over the reports.

WWE's continued business in Saudi Arabia remains a hot-button topic in professional wrestling, particularly with Crown Jewel (2 November) right around the corner, and PWTorch.com's Wade Keller has this week highlighted a damning new Washington Post article on current USA/Saudi relations.

It was unclear from this whether Saudi Arabia wanted to then kill him or arrest him, or if US officials made Khashoggi aware of this, the source said.

Trump on Monday expressed concern about Khashoggi's case and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called for a thorough investigation.

"The recent disappearance of Saudi journalist and Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi suggests that he could be a victim of a gross violation of internationally recognized human rights", the letter said.