Armeena Khan repsonds to former United Kingdom mayor for mocking Burqas

  • Armeena Khan repsonds to former United Kingdom mayor for mocking Burqas

Armeena Khan repsonds to former United Kingdom mayor for mocking Burqas

In a letter sent to The Times, Dr Hargey said there was "no Koranic legitimacy" for the burka, adding it was "a nefarious component of a trendy gateway theology for religious extremism and militant Islam".

"If a woman wants to wear a short dress, it is her right and freedom to do so".

She further said that a woman is not answerable to anyone if they wish to wear a burqa.

But Johnson received support from some quarters, with Conservative MP Nadine Dorries saying he "did not go far enough".

Mr Johnson, who quit Theresa May's Cabinet last month in a dispute over Brexit negotiations, used a newspaper column to argue against calls for a ban on the face-covering veils in public places, but described them as "absolutely ridiculous" and compared their wearers to rebellious teenagers. "I also know that many other people believe strongly that in the whole of the article, what Mr Johnson appears to have been attempting to do was to say that there shouldn't be a ban and that he was engaging in a legitimate debate".

Johnson resigned as Foreign Secretary in July, accusing Theresa May of killing "the Brexit dream" with her plan to seek close economic ties with the European Union after the United Kingdom leaves the bloc next year.

He said: "She's clearly wrong to have asked him to have apologised".

They said: "We must not fall into the trap of shutting down the debate on hard subjects".

"It's not the job of the Prime Minister to tell backbenchers what to do. If we fail to speak up for liberal values then we are simply yielding ground to reactionaries and extremists".

But the survey for the Sky News found people are split as to whether the former foreign secretary should apologise for his remarks - 45 per cent think he should do so, 48 per cent think he should not.