Hiroshima marks 73rd anniversary of atomic bombing in World War II

  • Hiroshima marks 73rd anniversary of atomic bombing in World War II

Hiroshima marks 73rd anniversary of atomic bombing in World War II

They included representatives from 85 countries, as well as survivors of the bombing.

In his speech at Hiroshima's Peace Memorial Park, Mayor Kazumi Matsui said certain nations were "rekindling tensions that had eased with the end of the Cold War", although he did not identify those nations.

"If the human family forgets history or stops confronting it, we could again commit a awful error".

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres said in his message during the ceremony that Hiroshima's legacy is one of "resilience" and sought continued moral support from the hibakusha survivors for efforts in promoting the ban of nuclear weapons.

"Today, even after 73 years, the innocent residents of Hiroshima and Nagasaki continue to suffer from the awful after effects of nuclear radiations", she said in the obituary references.

The mayor called on the Japanese government to lead the worldwide community towards "dialogue and cooperation for a world without nuclear weapons".

However, Japan has not become a signatory to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons which came into effect in July 2017.

Japan should live up to the spirit of its pacifist constitution to lead the global community "toward dialogue and cooperation for a world without nuclear weapons", Matsui said. "We in civil society fervently hope that the easing of tensions on the Korean Peninsula will proceed through peaceable dialogue", he added.

Japan has largely maintained a hard line on Pyongyang, in particular pushing for movement on citizens abducted decades ago by North Korean agents.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who also was at the ceremony, said differences between the nuclear and non-nuclear states are widening.

Japan needs to lead the worldwide community toward "dialogue and cooperation for a world without nuclear weapons", the mayor added.

The final death toll is estimated at 140,000 and - along with the bomb that was dropped on Nagasaki three days later - ended Japan's involvement in the Second World War.

Russell Gackenbach was told one thing about the mission he was about to embark on: It could end World War II.

Organizers of this year's observance hope to draw attention to the treaty and have the U.S.be the first of the nuclear powers to take the first steps in ratifying it.

The bombs claimed the lives of 140,000 people in Hiroshima and 74,000 people in Nagasaki.