Pancreatic Cancer: Cannabis Compound May Boost Survival

  • Pancreatic Cancer: Cannabis Compound May Boost Survival

Pancreatic Cancer: Cannabis Compound May Boost Survival

"We found that mice with pancreatic cancer survived almost three times longer if a constituent of medicinal cannabis was added to their chemotherapy treatment", said lead author Marco Falasca from Queen Mary University of London in Britain. With a five-year survival rate of only 8.5 percent, according to the U.S.

Mice with the disease lived nearly three times longer after being given cannabidiol - also known as CBD - and chemotherapy compared to those receiving only chemotherapy.

The study comes after research suggested a supplement from cannabis could prolong the life of pancreatic cancer patients.

The findings showed that a gene named IKZF1 recruits T cells in alopecia areata - a condition in which immune cells attack and destroy hair cells - that gets switched off during several types of cancer.

"This is a remarkable result, we found that mice with pancreatic cancer survived almost three times longer if a constituent of medicinal cannabis was added to their chemotherapy treatment", said Queen Mary professor Marco Falasa. In 2015, pancreatic cancers were responsible for 411,600 deaths, and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) estimates doctors will diagnose 55,440 new cases of the disease before the end of 2018. Pancreatic cancer is aggressive and has one of the lowest survival rate of all cancers, researchers said.

Scientists have found cannabidiol, often known as CBD, could extend patients' lives by a matter of years following research conducted on mice by Queen Mary University of London and Curtin University in Australia.

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is extracted by soaking the plant in alcohol and then evaporating the liquid.

"This is a remarkable result", Dr. Marco Falasca, a researcher at Queen Mary, said in a press release.

"Cannabidiol is already approved for use in clinics, which means we can quickly go on to test this in human clinical trials".

However, The federal government intends to make only fresh or dried cannabis, and limited oils available upon legalization. One substance known as cannabidiol could help boost treatment and survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer.

'We are incredibly grateful for all our supporters, who have helped us fund Professor Nick Lemoine and his team to hopefully develop this much-needed new treatment for pancreatic cancer'.