Brett Kavanaugh picked for Supreme Court by President Trump

President Donald Trump is going down to the wire as he makes his choice on a replacement for retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, but he says with his final four options "you can't go wrong".

The White House and Republican party want the nomination in the bag before November's mid-term elections.

Kavanaugh, 53, has served as a US Court of Appeals judge for the DC Circuit for 12 years, providing opinions on key tech issues like net neutrality and government surveillance.

Neil Gorsuch, 50, who was appointed by Mr Trump a year ago, is already one of the most conservative of the court's nine justices. Trump signed Kavanaugh's nomination papers Monday evening in the White House residence.

The president has also spoken with confidence about how his Supreme Court pick will work out.

Kavanaugh is likely to be more conservative than Justice Kennedy on a range of social issues. The White House said Monday that former Arizona Sen.

The new justice can be expected to cast crucial votes on other matters of national importance including gay rights, gun control, the death penalty and voting rights. But there's one qualification that could prove a problem for the judge: his ties to the Bush family have reportedly raised Trump's suspicions.

"There is no one in America more qualified for this position and no one more deserving", said Trump, who called Kavanaugh "one of the sharpest legal minds of our time".

But that element of his record is among the reasons that some Republicans in Congress are concerned about a confirmation hearing in the Senate.

Democratic Sen. Richard Blumenthal of CT, who is on the Senate Judiciary Committee that holds hearings on Supreme Court nominees, told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos on "This Week" that Trump has "outsourced" his decision to the Federalist Society and the Heritage Foundation.

As the president deliberated, the conservative Judicial Crisis Network prepared for a seven-figure advertising buy in four states to support the eventual nominee.

The confirmation process promises to be a fight, and Republicans have a narrow 51-49 majority - with nearly no room to lose votes as Republican Senator John McCain of Arizona remains absent while fighting brain cancer.

Kavanaugh says he will begin meeting with members of the Senate on Tuesday. Top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer on Monday said Trump's nominee should be obligated to make his or her views clear on matters like the Roe ruling.

All eyes on which senators?

Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Doug Jones of Alabama, Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Diane Feinstein of California.

Democrats - unable to block the nominee unless they lure some Republican senators to their side - have stressed the high stakes of the president's decision as they prepare for the confirmation battle ahead. Gorsuch, who worked at the Justice Department in 2005 and 2006, had a smaller set of executive branch documents for review.

Meanwhile, liberal groups are already calling on two moderate Republican senators - Susan Collins of ME and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska - to reject the nominee.

Trump has previously said he wanted "pro-life" justices opposed to abortion rights.

Activists have sent coat hangers - an abortion rights symbol - to her office.