United Kingdom minister resigns, plans to rebel over parliament's Brexit role

The key vote which has taken place is whether MPs will have a "meaningful vote" - amendment 19 proposed by the Lords - on the final Brexit agreement.

This led him not to force his own amendment to a vote, while the potential rebels backed away from voting against the government on a similar House of Lords amendment, thereby allowing ministers to remove the peers' changes to the bill.

Theresa May's government gives in to Tory rebels in order to avoid a major defeat on the EU Withdrawal Bill.

"The government have conceded that this is necessary and I expect to see a new amendment to cover this situation soon".

Conservative lawmaker Phillip Lee, who voted to remain in the European Union in Britain's 2016 referendum, resigned as a justice minister so he could vote against the government on a key measure.

The victory was the first major win in two days of debates on the government's European Union withdrawal bill, which will sever ties with the European Union, after the upper house of parliament, the House of Lords, introduced 15 changes.

As the clock ticked down to the vote, two rebels stood up to say they were satisfied with what the government had offered them.

The Government has won the first votes during today's Brexit showdown.

The Brexit Secretary warned that the UK's entire approach to negotiations with the EU is at risk of being undermined by amendments to its flagship EU Withdrawal bill.

Phillip Lee, who resigned this morning, gave an impassioned speech from the "naughty corner" on the backbenches - flanked by Remainers including Bob Neill, Nicky Morgan, receiving congratulations for his decision by Soubry and Sarah Wollaston.

The logic of that argument is that EU negotiator Michel Barnier would prefer the softest of Brexits - a model known as "Norway plus", in which Britain remains in the European Economic Area (EEA) and the customs union, accepting all single market rules, including freedom of movement, and the EU's trade policy without any representation in Brussels.

Well what the Remainer MPs thought they heard from May does not seem compatible with Davis's red lines.

He said a concession of this kind would been "revolutionary" as the Commons can not override the government when it came to negotiating global treaties.

Asked what concessions he had been given by the PM, Mr Grieve said: "The Prime Minister agreed that the amendments we had tabled, and the issue that we had raised about Parliament's role in the event of no deal, was an important one and undertook to work with us to put together amendments to present in the Lords which would address those concerns".

But she faces a gruelling bout of "parliamentary ping-pong" with the Lords, as the Bill bounces back and forth between the two Houses over the coming weeks.

The House of Lords has inserted 15 amendments to soften the terms of Britain's departure.

It is expected that Tuesday will see MPs decide whether Parliament should have the power to set the Government's negotiating goals if Theresa May's deal with Brussels is voted down.

Rebels had been pushing for an amendment that would have given Parliament unprecedented powers over the final stages of Brexit talks.