Prime Minister hit by dramatic resignation as MPs debate Brexit

Theresa May has averted an embarrassing defeat over the government's EU Withdrawal Bill by giving MPs a say on the next steps for Brexit if she fails to secure a withdrawal agreement by the end of November.

MPs in the House of Commons will vote on a raft of amendments produced by the House of Lords, including one at around 3 p.m. GMT (8.30 p.m. IST) that would give parliament an effective veto over Brexit.

Theresa May has seen off a threatened rebellion on Brexit with last-minute concessions which could give MPs a bigger say on the final withdrawal agreement and make a "no-deal" European Union exit all but impossible. That has potentially seismic consequences for the protracted and increasingly messy split from Brussels.

"I've been through this before when in opposition and now that when we're in Government, because if the House makes the concession of allowing the dialogue to continue and I can see the merit of that happening, it has got to be done in good faith".

Conservative Brexit campaigners accused those in the party who indicated they would vote against the government of not respecting the referendum result.

Conservative lawmaker Phillip Lee resigned as a justice minister Tuesday so he could speak out against the policy on Brexit.

Dr Lee, who represents the Leave-voting Bracknell seat, said in a lengthy resignation statement: "Our Parliament should be able to direct our Government to change course in our interests".

These were the words of a minister expecting to win the vote.

The government won the first set of votes Tuesday, but looked set to face defeat on the issue of whether Parliament should have a "meaningful vote" on the Brexit deal.

The upshot of the shift may well be as dramatic as the parliamentary procedure is incomprehensible.

The victory - by 324 votes to 298 - only came after public haggling between ministers and would-be rebels and a meeting between Mrs May and more than a dozen Tory MPs.

The SNP doesn't have any Lords because of an ideological disagreement with the concept of an unelected upper house - but it does have plenty of MPs in the Commons. "How can Boris [Johnson, the foreign secretary] and the ERG [the European Research Group of Euroskeptic MPs] live with this?"

The government's eleventh hour amendment, lifted in large parts from Tory Remainer Dominic Grieve's own proposal and to be presented to the Lords on Monday, is expected to give MPs the right to veto the government's strategy if it fails to secure a political agreement with the European Union by 30 November.

Shadow Brexit Secretary Keir Starmer commented: "This vote was about ensuring parliament was given a proper role in the Brexit negotiations and that we avoid a no deal situation, which is becoming more likely with the divisions at the heart of this government".

"We have not, and will not, agree to the House of Commons binding the government's hands in the negotiations". They stood down after the government promised to engage in talks on a compromise.