Government wins Brexit bill vote after concessions

MPs will spend a total of 12 hours debating and voting on 14 Lords amendments to the EU Withdrawal Bill - six hours on Tuesday and six hours on Wednesday.

It's been revealed ex-Tory ministers Ken Clarke and Anna Soubry rebelled against the government by voting against the motion to disagree with Lords amendment, created to give Parliament a vote to prevent a "no deal" Brexit.

The debate, which lasted for almost three hours, was split down the usual non-partisan lines that have emerged as a result of Brexit, with the likes of Labour's Kate Hoey and John Mann saying they would back the Conservative government, while Tories including Ken Clarke and Anna Soubry spoke in favour of Grieve.

Our lobby team has also been told by Conservative sources that four more junior ministers were considering following Lee by quitting their jobs as part of a coordinated plot to scupper May's Brexit plans. One lawmaker said the government had promised to propose a new amendment that will reflect a rebel proposal.

After winning Tuesday's ballot over changes to a future "meaningful vote" on a final agreement with Brussels in her European Union withdrawal bill, May's plans to end more than 40 years of membership in the bloc were still on track.

Mid Norfolk MP George Freeman had earlier indicated he was not sure how he would vote on the question of whether parliament should get a final say on the Brexit deal.

In a day of drama, May's position seemed suddenly weaker when junior justice minister Phillip Lee, who has always been critical of Brexit strategy, resigned and said he would vote against the government.

Should the prime minister go back on her pledge, the rebels are confident their amendment will be inserted into the bill in the Lords. The views expressed therein are not necessarily those of stlucianewsonline.com, its sponsors or advertisers.

Britain's Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union (Brexit Minister) David Davis leave from 10 Downing Street in London on 7 June 2018.

Her concession to discuss the changes may mean lawmakers could have more power if she fails to secure a Brexit deal, possibly leading to a softer approach to Britain's divorce.

The victory was Pyrrhic, as the government's earlier climbdown all but ensures MPs will have an increased say on the terms of any deal.

It is not clear what the rebels may have been offered by the Whips behind closed doors to persuade them to toe the party line.

The legislation is now back before the House of Commons after a total of 15 defeats by the House of Lords.

Further clashes were expected on Wednesday during debate on amendments relating to how closely Britain stays aligned with the EU's economy after leaving.

The E.U. (Withdrawal) Bill is the draft law that would set the legal framework for Brexit and Ms.

Grieve told MPs: "If we don't achieve a deal at all, the fact is we are going to be facing an huge crisis". That clause - drafted by Grieve - basically hands a lot of power to Parliament if no deal has been agreed by the end of November.

Talks will now be held between ministers and Tory MPs uneasy with the government's handling of Brexit, in the hope of reaching an agreement before the legislation is passed back to the House of Lords.

The votes in the House of Commons, the elected chamber, could influence negotiations over the future relationship between the European Union and the United Kingdom after Brexit.

"I want to end up having a meaningful discussion so we can move forward positively".