David Davis says parliament vote can not reverse Brexit

May also told them she would try to capture another of their concerns, as enshrined in Grieve's amendment to the EU Withdrawal bill - which would much more explicitly give MPs the whip hand in Brexit talks, if May has still not done a deal with the EU by February next year.

Earlier on Tuesday Brexit Minister David Davis issued a warning to parliament over the possibility of rejecting the government's compromise on the "meaningful vote" and backing the House of Lords amendment.

Ken Clarke accused prominent Brexiteers of behaving like Donald Trump over the weekend and was keen for parliament to regain some power in the negotiations.

She won a succession of votes on Tuesday overturning Lords amendments, including one which would have removed the date of Brexit on March 29 2019 from the text of the Bill.

Ministers have conceded in principle to Tory rebels" demands for a "meaningful vote' on the eventual Brexit deal. Mr Grieve's proposal will now be added to the legislation. "I'm fairly confident we will be able to do that".

The bill will then go back to the Lords on Monday.

She said unless there was a "meaningful vote" Parliament would be left with "the grim choice between a poor deal and exit with no deal at all".

"In all conscience, I can not support the Government's decision to oppose this amendment because doing so breaches such fundamental principles of human rights and Parliamentary sovereignty".

In a day of drama, May's position seemed suddenly weaker when junior justice minister Phillip Lee, who has always been critical of the government's Brexit strategy, resigned and said he would vote against the government.

And in a final vote, MPs voted by 326 votes to 301 to disagree with Lords amendment 52 linked to what European Union laws the United Kingdom will keep after Brexit.

It is thought that both the government and the Remainer group of Tory MPs consider the outcome to be a success. Lee, who voted for Britain to remain in the E.U.in the 2016 referendum, said in a statement he was "incredibly sad" to resign but did so in order to vote against the government's position on a key amendment to the bill.

The bill has also become of the focus of several attempts by MPs and peers to change parts of the government's approach to Brexit.

They've been battling against Brexit on a number of fronts, including trying to ensure that Scotland doesn't lose powers back to Westminster when they come back from Brussels.

Anna Soubry, a pro-EU Conservative MP, said she knew of one legislator who would not vote with their conscience because of "threats to their personal safety" and that of staff and family.

LONDON - A junior member of Prime Minister Theresa May's government resigned Tuesday over Brexit, emboldening pro-EU lawmakers ahead of key votes in Parliament on Britain's departure from the European Union.

Following the vote, shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer said: "Facing the prospect of a humiliating defeat Theresa May has been forced to enter negotiations with her backbenchers and offer a so-called concession".