Natural disaster and ash eruption hit Kilauea volcano

  • Natural disaster and ash eruption hit Kilauea volcano

Natural disaster and ash eruption hit Kilauea volcano

Scientists said that while the height of the lava varies depending on the source and local topography, much of the area is covered in 10 to 20 feet of molten rock.

The smoke is a result of the lava hitting the ocean water, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

New footage has been released by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) showing lava stretching a mile out to sea after filling Kapoho Bay on Hawaii's Big Island. At least 117 homes have already been taken by lava in the Lanipuna Gardens and Leilani Estates neighborhoods where lava surfaced more than a month ago.

The volcano in the Big Island of Hawaii, still continuous to erupt, with no signs of calming down.

"Lava continues to enter the ocean along a broad front in Kapoho Bay and the Vacationland area and it continues to creep north of what remains of Kapoho Beach Lots", said USGS geologist Janet Babb.

Also present at the press conference, Hawaii Governor David Ige said state will allocate 12 million US dollars to help respond to the eruption, covering expenses ranging from overtime work to food and equipment.

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     EARTHQUAKE The tremor struck near the crater
GOOGLE EARTHQUAKE The tremor struck near the crater

Kim told reporters that in the last three days alone, 320 of the homes were destroyed in the coastal community of Kapoho along with all the homes in Vacationland.

Hundreds of homes have been destroyed, and thousands of people displaced.

Plumes of volcanic ash belched into the air by periodic daily explosions from the crater at Kilauea's summit have posed an additional nuisance and a health concern to nearby communities.

This helicopter footage shot on the morning of June 6 shows the new lava delta and clouds of steam, hydrochloric acid gas and volcanic glass shards rising from where lava made contact with the sea.

In addition to destroying homes and other structures, lava flows have knocked out telephone and power lines, causing widespread communication outages, and forced the shutdown of a geothermal energy plant that normally provides about a quarter of the island's electricity.