Trump trade fury torpedoes Canada’s G7 summit

The money raised exceeds the $1.3 billion USA over three years that a coalition of 30 non-governmental organizations had called on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to raise as part of his chairmanship of the G7 this year.

President Donald Trump delivered a threat to foreign leaders during a press conference Saturday at the 2018 G7 summit in Quebec, Canada: If they don't dramatically reduce tariffs and trade barriers, "we'll stop trading with them".

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Saturday that he has asked U.S. representatives not to endorse the joint communique put out by the Group of Seven leaders after Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's "false statements" at a news conference.

Trump gave "a long, frank rant", the official said, repeating a position he carried through the 2016 U.S. election campaign into the White House that the United States had suffered at the hands of its trading partners, with French President Emmanuel Macron pushing back on the assertion and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe chiming in.

"Our Tariffs are in response to his of 270% on dairy!" the US president tweeted.

The Prime Minister said: "Where we disagree with our allies on something it is right that we say so and air the issue openly and frankly".

The response from Mr Macron suggests an end to what observers had noted was a budding "bromance" between the French president and Mr Trump.

The US president repeated his call for Vladimir Putin to join the other leaders around the summit table.

"The United States has been taken advantage of for decades and decades and we can't do that anymore". Instead, he emphasized the need for other countries to reduce their barriers against the United States, such as Canadian duties on US dairy.

"We do not want the situation to escalate to a full-blown and merciless trade war, but hostile actions can not be left unanswered", French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said this week.

His statements on the sidelines of the contentious G7 summit come just weeks after his administration slapped metals tariffs on Canada, the European Union and Mexico, who quickly announced their own retaliatory measures. "We make commitments and keep them", the presidency said, adding that "France and Europe maintain their support for this statement".

"Canadians are polite and reasonable but we will also not be pushed around", he said. But Trump's abbreviated stay at this Quebec resort saw him continuing the same type of tough talk on trade as when he departed the White House, when he accused Trudeau of being "indignant".

Trump himself told reporters on Saturday that the summit was not contentious and called his relationship with G7 allies a "10".

French President Emmanuel Macron described it as a good first step that represented the G7 nations' desire to stabilize the situation.

A key question was whether the seven countries could agree on a joint statement of priorities at the conclusion of the meeting.

Russian Federation was suspended in 2014 because of its annexation of Crimea from Ukraine.

Trump's change of heart appeared to have been invoked by Trudeau's comments on Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs against Canada and other allies.

"I think it would be an asset to have Russian Federation back in, I think it would be good for the world, I think it would be good for Russian Federation, I think it would be good for the United States, I think it would be good for all the countries of the current G7", he said.