Rafael Nadal, the King of Clay, Wins His 11th French Open Title

As he sat down in the French Open lounge on Saturday, Günter Bresnik, Dominic Thiem's coach, was asked about Thiem's upcoming French Open final against Rafael Nadal, the finest clay court tennis player of all time.

Nadal said afterwards that he feared the worst when the cramp struck: 'There was a tough moment in the third set, I was very very scared but that's sport.

Fair enough Thiem was demolished by Nadal in last year's semi-final in Paris but today's seventh seed has added more aggression and self belief to his game. A forehand long. Just like that, Nadal was off on a five-game run that put him up 3-0 in the second set.

But at 4-5 Thiem's serve let him down badly, handing Nadal three set points.

In his quest to become the first men's player in the Open era to win each of the Grand Slams twice, Djokovic, who underwent surgery on his elbow after January's Australian Open, looked unhappy even when he was stroking winners past his opponent. McEnroe would win the battle of the fourth set but Borg ultimately won the tennis war, finally triumphing 8-6 in the fifth set to claim his fifth successive (and, as it would turn out, last) Wimbledon crown.

However, there was no real impact on court as the top seed completed the job to move within three Slams of Roger Federer. The Austrian has improved on the return serves here to equalise the game.

The Coupe des Mousquetaires trophy was back in Nadal's arms after his straight-sets victory over David Ferrer in 2013, but the hard yards were achieved in the semi-finals when he defeated Djokovic 6-4 3-6 6-1 6-7 9-7 in a four-hour, 37-minute epic.

Unlike previous year - when those first few games realistically settled things - Thiem bounced back, breaking straight away.

A wild, misguided forehand sealed his fate, one of 18 unforced errors to Nadal's 12 in the set. And he took the biggest of big cuts on his groundstrokes, his feet leaving the ground as he threw his whole body into them, as if the very outcome of the match - not any individual point, but the whole shebang - depended on the strength of that one whip of his white racket.

"He played wonderful, so congratulations for a great performance", he said.

The unseeded Hozumi and Ninomiya were the first all-Japanese duo to reach a Grand Slam final in women's doubles.

Rafael Nadal bids for his record-extending 11th French Open championship when he faces Dominic Thiem in the final. He also beat the Spaniard in Buenos Aires in 2016.

And he will fancy his chances, having been the second best clay-court player in the world for the last two seasons behind Nadal, whom he has beaten three times, most recently in the Madrid Open quarter-finals last month. The finals take place on Saturday and Sunday afternoon after 2 PM GMT.