Lava from Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano creates new coastline

  • Lava from Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano creates new coastline

Lava from Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano creates new coastline

The new land in Kapoho Bay is now owned by the state, but the peninsula will not look like the farmland that dominates that region of the Big Island anytime soon.

Kilauea, the most active of Hawaii's five volcanoes, is feared to be on the brink of another major eruption after being rattled by more than 500 earthquakes over the weekend.

County civil defence officials had a day earlier put the confirmed number of homes destroyed during the past month at 130, all of them in and around the Leilani Estates community, where lava-spouting fissures opened up on the volcano's eastern flank on May 3.

Copernicus Sentinel-2 images from 23 May and 7 June 2018 show changes in lava flow from the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island.

Hawaii Gov. David Ige says the state was giving the county $12 million to help it respond to the eruption.

Geologists say the ongoing eruptions have pumped out enough lava to fill more than 45,000 Olympic-sized pools and cover Manhattan in 6 and a half feet of lava.

Seaside residents and boaters also have been warned to avoid noxious clouds of laze - a term derived from the words "lava" and "haze" - formed when lava reacts with seawater to form a mix of acid fumes, steam and glass-like particles when it flows into the ocean.

A small ohia tree was observed by a National Park Service employee during of a tour of a two-year-old inactive flow in Kalapana last week. Lava entering the ocean builds a platform of new land known as a lava delta.

"A lot of the ocean entries are extraordinarily unstable", Ms Ferracane said.

"The bench that was formed during 2016 and 2017 61G flow has already collapsed and fallen into the ocean, so nobody really owns that any longer".

The lava, which has covered more than 5,000 acres (2023.47 hectares) in this latest eruption is not only expansive, but very thick.

The latest estimate of property losses from Kilauea, one of the world's most active volcanoes, far surpasses the 215 structures consumed by lava during an earlier eruption cycle that began in 1983 and continued almost nonstop over three decades. Molten rock has entirely covered the neighborhood of "Vacationland" on Hawaii's big island as it continues to spread into nearby Kapoho Bay. They too are cut off and inaccessible.