Nation commemorates victims of Manchester Arena bombing on first anniversary of atrocity

  • Nation commemorates victims of Manchester Arena bombing on first anniversary of atrocity

Nation commemorates victims of Manchester Arena bombing on first anniversary of atrocity

On Tuesday, Grande tweeted: "Thinking of you all today and every day". "Thinking of you all today and every day", she wrote, with an emoji of the bumblebee which is a symbol of Manchester.

Salman Abedi (22) detonated his suicide bomb device at the end of the concert with 353 people, including 175 children, around him in the foyer of the venue.

One of the groups performing is the Manchester Survivors Choir, a group made up of those who were there on the night of the attack, and a local school choir that performed onstage with Grande at the One Love concert.

Grande suspended her Dangerous Woman Tour after the bombing and returned for the One Love Manchester charity concert weeks later, which raised funds for victims of the attack.

Rachel and Mia, from Bolton, said they had come "to show we won't be beaten and show you carry on and remember those who died".

The 22 victims of the Manchester Arena atrocity were remembered yesterday at an emotional national commemoration service.

The Duke of Cambridge and Theresa May were among those who paid homage at a special ceremony at Manchester Cathedral before a minute's silence was observed.

Another single lit candle represented the 800 left with physical.

"I was one of the first to really talk about what happened that night and I think by doing that it has helped me come through it", he said.

The service, attended by first responders, civic leaders and some of the scores injured in the bombing, led the minute of silence at 2.30pm (2330 AEST), which was also marked at British government buildings nationwide.

Flowers left by people as they pay their respects in St Annes Square on the 1st anniversary.

Later, thousands of people - including a choir of attack survivors - gathered for a concert and sing-song in the city's Albert Square.

Nine-year-old Molly said she was taking part because it was "a good thing to do for all the people who can't be here", while Matty, 14, said the unity in singing "is what Manchester's all about".

Bells will ring out across the city center at 10:31 p.m.to mark the exact moment of the explosion previous year.

Prince William and the Prime Minister privately met bereaved families at the cathedral following the service and both attached notes to one of the Trees of Hope, a trail of small Japanese maple trees from Victoria Station to St Ann's Square, to add to the many thousands of similar messages of support and hope left by members of the public.