'Yanny' or 'Laurel'? Why People Hear Different Things In That Viral Clip

  • 'Yanny' or 'Laurel'? Why People Hear Different Things In That Viral Clip

'Yanny' or 'Laurel'? Why People Hear Different Things In That Viral Clip

In perhaps the most vexing element of the debate, the majority of listeners hear beyond doubt one of the two words, with few waffling between the two.

Alicia Spoor, president of the Academy of Doctors of Audiology, agreed the quality was not good.

"If you turn the volume very low, there will be practically no bass and you will hear Yanny", a Reddit user wrote confidently.

The two words mesh well enough to be combined into one recording.

The controversy recalls the similarly impassioned debate that broke out over the #TheDress: in 2015 a photo of a two-toned frock had social media users tearing their hair out over whether its colors were white and gold, or black and blue.

The audio clip bends the question to what is heard, rather than what is seen, and people are fired up about it. She said she heard laurel.

That filtering "takes away the entire perception of hearing the word "Yanny" and all you get is the word 'Laurel, '" he says. Where this does matter, she says, and where similar issues are at play, is how people fill in the gaps of their hearing when faced with a noisy context.

When McCreery was at home, listening on his phone, he clearly heard "Laurel".

For an analogy, she cited the 1969 Creedence Clearwater Revival song "Bad Moon Rising:" "There's a bad moon on the rise" versus "there's a bathroom on the right".

It's the audio equivalent of "the dress", which drove America insane back in 2015 as millions disputed whether the outfit was white and gold or black and blue.