The New Gmail Comes With Self-Destructing Emails

  • The New Gmail Comes With Self-Destructing Emails

The New Gmail Comes With Self-Destructing Emails

Google is also working to enhance confidentiality in Gmail by allowing users to set a pin for their emails.

There's now no word on a final release date for the new Gmail, however, a message to early access testers hints at a launch date in the coming weeks.

The all-new design brings a slew of changes, including the ability to quickly reply to emails with an automatically-regenerated response, and snooze emails to a later time. Similarly, the actual security offered by this concept may also be limited, as the TechCrunch report notes that there is no control mechanism preventing the user from taking a screenshot of the message. There will also be a snooze feature which lets you snooze conversations and allows you to temporarily delete the emails from your inbox for a selected time limit. The Verge has obtained screenshots of the new Gmail design, now being tested inside Google and with trusted partners.

We are expecting a major announcement for the Gmail app soon and part of this update may actually include a self-destruct function.

Google has announced past year that they are finally upgrading the files attachment feature for their email service which allows the users to send and receive messages with attachments up to 50MB size. Google uses machine learning to tune Smart Reply's suggestions to your writing style, so the more you use it, the more useful it gets. Also, the new feature will be smoothly embedded in the compose screen of the Gmail website which will make it easier for the users to switch to the "Confidential Mode". This "confidential mode" should prevent people from forwarding, printing or downloading the email and may also allow senders to require recipients to verify their identity with a personal identification number.

When the update rolls out across the world, it's expected that you will be able to click a little lock icon whilst typing an email to set an "expiry date". You can simply choose one of the three and hit send, tweak it as desired, or ignore all three and hand craft your own reply.

And if you want to take privacy to the next level, there's an option to include an obligatory SMS passcode in order to open the email.

The ability to send confidential emails that expire.

The report also indicates that a "Learn more" link in the preview points to Google's help section, though the linked page was not found.