Manila slams United Nations rights chief

  • Manila slams United Nations rights chief

Manila slams United Nations rights chief

In a more direct statement, he added, "Relevant sides of the global community, including the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, shall respect the sovereignty of the Philippines and the will of its people, view the outcomes of the Philippines' fight against drug and terrorism in a comprehensive, unbiased and objective way, and support its efforts to move forward to its human rights cause in light of its national conditions".

Zeid was standing up for his colleagues - UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples Vicky Tauli-Corpuz, who the government wants declared as a terrorist; and UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial killings Agnes Callamard, who has been on the receiving end of Duterte's tirades.

"The achievements made by the Philippine government led by President Duterte on these fronts have won great approval and extensive support among the Philippine people", Lu told reporters during a regular a ministry news conference in Beijing. "This kind of comment is unacceptable, unacceptable".

Duterte has always been the target of global criticism over his war on drugs, which has resulted in numerous extrajudicial killings.

"These human rights [people] are dumb", Duterte added.

The Philippines welcomed a United Nations investigation into Duterte's signature war on drugs but objected to Callamard leading it, saying she was biased and not qualified. Do you have crocodiles here, the ones that really eat humans? "If you investigate me, I'll slap you", Duterte said at the time, according to Rappler online news website.

Duterte has also repeatedly insulted the current United Nations special rapporteur on extrajudicial killings, Agnes Callamard, because of her criticism of his bloody anti-narcotics campaign. "Why? Because you are insulting me. Why?"

Duterte's response came after Zeid on Friday called on the UN Human Rights Council to take a stand against Duterte's personal vendetta against UN rights officials, who have criticized Manila's war on drugs.

The Commission on Human Rights on Tuesday, March 14, urged the Philippine government to stop its attacks on human rights bodies and defenders.

The Government petition included Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, appointed in 2014 as United Nations special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, who was listed as a senior member of the Maoist rebel group.

Mr Duterte has been regularly venting his fury at the Maoists and considers them as much of a security threat as the domestic Islamist militant groups that have pledged allegiance to Islamic State.

Also on the list were four former Catholic priests and former congressman Satur Ocampo, who said he would challenge any "terrorist" label.

Manila hit back at Zeid's comments on Saturday, noting that Tauli-Corpuz was included on the list not because of her position as Special Rapporteur but because of her alleged links with the Ilocos-Cordillera Regional Committee (ICRC) of the CPP-NPA.

Ms Tauli-Corpuz denounced the Government, calling the complaint "baseless, malicious and irresponsible".