BlackBerry launches new cybersecurity software for self-driving cars

  • BlackBerry launches new cybersecurity software for self-driving cars

BlackBerry launches new cybersecurity software for self-driving cars

BlackBerry CEO John Chen showed up at the North American International Automotive Show (NAIAS) in Detroit on Monday to introduce the company's latest security product for the connected auto space.

BlackBerry CEO John Chen described Jarvis as "one of a kind" offering that is easy to use as well as being scalable and cost-effective for manufacturers of all sizes. According to BlackBerry, this type of distributed supply chain setup creates a need for software that can predict and fix vulnerabilities in near real-time in order to stay ahead of potential "bad actors" and avoid failures caused by human error.

But because Blackberry rather made a mess of its smartphone prowess, failing to keep enterprising rappers from sticking with BBM when Apple came along waving its iPhones and iMessage, Blackberry will be looking at potentially pushing Jarvis into the healthcare and industrial sectors. The cybersecurity firm says the product "battle-hardens" a vehicle's software, which is a "tempting attack surface for cyber criminals".

Once initiated, automakers will have online access to Jarvis and can scan any number of binary files (non-text files) at every stage of software development.

"Jarvis is a game-changer for original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) because for the first time, they have a complete, consistent, and near real-time view into the security posture of a vehicle's entire code base", Chen said. This includes the capability to evaluate new software under consideration as well as the ability to assess existing software already in production.

"BlackBerry Jarvis addresses the software cybersecurity needs of the automotive industry". Results are provided immediately via dashboards with specific advisories.

Besides, Jarvis ensures production software adheres to industry standards as set by the Motor Industry Software Reliability Association (MISRA), a body which sets down guidelines for software developed in automobiles. BlackBerry claims to have already tested Jarvis with Jaguar Land Rover, the chief executive of which admitted that Jarvis helped in reducing the time needed to assess code from 30 days to seven minutes.