Google looking into Home and Chromecast devices that kill Wi-Fi networks

  • Google looking into Home and Chromecast devices that kill Wi-Fi networks

Google looking into Home and Chromecast devices that kill Wi-Fi networks

The smart speaker appeared to be crashing the TP-Link Archer C7 router, a problem that Google has confirmed and is now investigating.

Users on Google Product Forums that the problem emerges particularly with a network powered by the Archer C7.

If your Wi-Fi derps while using Google Home or Chromecast, you're not alone. TP-Link acknowledge the issue, saying many users of its Archer C1200 have been experiencing issues with network connectivity, and offered up some technical insight into what is going on. Those suffering from wonky wireless issues report the problem with Chromecast and Google Home devices on ASUS, Linksys, Netgear, TP-Link, and Synology routers. We're hoping that the problem is addressed and a fix rolled out soon, as it doesn't seem to be isolated and the number of users affected by it is significant. Now, it looks like something similar is happening with the Google Home Max.

Wi-Fi router vendors have started issuing patches to defend their products against Google Chromecast devices. However, later on, several non-TP-Link users also reported the same issue.

Last month, some and users have reported. The company said engineers are now investigating the matter and indicated detailed feedbacks sent in by customer will help resolve the issue fast. Be sure to include the keyword "GHT3 - Unable to set up Max to network" and check the box to "Include screenshot and logs".

Google looking into Home and Chromecast devices that kill Wi-Fi networks

For its part, TP-Link said initial investigation showed the problem could have been triggered by Multicast Domain Name System or MDNS, which is the transmission of discovery packets to maintain live connection in a network.

Linksys notes that its beta testing has gone well and that the updated firmware should take care of the majority of issues that people have been complaining about, though there are a few scenarios that it hasn't been able to test yet. Home Max apparently is sending thousands of these packets in a short span of time, thereby overloading the router which results in jamming the network.

In response to this abnormal issue, we have created a beta firmware for each version of the Archer C1200, which can be downloaded using the links below.

For now, the options available are the firmware bump released by TP-Link and the workaround discovered by Hadden.