Florida Monkeys May Infect Humans With Possibly Fatal Herpes Virus

  • Florida Monkeys May Infect Humans With Possibly Fatal Herpes Virus

Florida Monkeys May Infect Humans With Possibly Fatal Herpes Virus

Wild Monkeys are spreading Herpes to people as found in a recent study on Monkeys.

Feral rhesus macaque monkeys at a Florida state park carry a herpes virus risky to humans.

Numerous rhesus macaque monkeys at a Florida state park carry a unsafe herpes virus that could potentially spread to humans through their excrement, according to a new study.

Although there have been no documented cases of macaque-to-human transmission of the herpes B virus, we still do not know enough about the potential risks. Yet the researchers have not scrutinized this issue in depth.

A study published on Wednesday in Emerging Infectious Diseases, a journal fromthe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention prompted researchers from the universities of Florida and Washington to warn Florida's wildlife agency that certain monkeys could be considered a public health concern.

Eason could not augment on what particular organizational strategies the state may appoint but a spokeswoman said that the enterprise assists purifying the state of the fast growing creatures. Instead, the monkeys also carry the virus in the saliva and other bodily fluids, which may spread the disease to humans.

"It is interesting to see oral shedding at all", Civitello said in the story. "It will be important to figure out whether underreporting, low quantities, or low transmissibility would explain why infections in tourists have not been reported". Blood tests showed the monkey carried herpes B. However, a woman who had been bitten by the monkey tested negative for the virus. Humans feeding the monkeys is a common activity along the Silver River. A rhesus monkey on the loose in Pinellas County for more than two years was caught in October 2012. Within minutes, curious kayakers and other boat tour operators pulled close to shore for a better look and to snap photos.

About 175 free-roaming rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) inhabit the park, descended from a population of around a dozen animals that were released in the 1930s to promote local tourism.

"They didn't know monkeys could swim", O'Lenick said.

Macaques were introduced to Florida's Silver Springs State Park as a tourist attraction nearly 100 years ago.

State officials would not go into detail about their plan for removing the monkeys going forward.

Wildlife officials are now pushing for the removal of the monkeys roaming in Florida in the interest of public health and safety.